JSB-p008

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The Thirteenth Earl of Cassillis p008

{8} may be attributed to his occasional association with geologists, biologists, ornithologists, and horticultural pathologists. However, it may have been inherited from his grandfather, for the sequence of events in the tragedy of Mary Bell are not in accord with the dates given, commencing with the camp meeting and ending with the death of the child.

There is another entry which has aroused much curiosity, that of January 1, 1827, concerning the half-tickets. Several navy clerks have been consulted, but the explanations they have offered are not altogether convincing. It is their belief that when sailors sought discharge before their time had expired they were given certificates showing the amount of money to which they were entitled. These certificates were called tickets, and the sailors cashed them whenever they could, at a discount, of course. Later these certificates, or tickets, were presented to the paymaster for collection. It seems from the entry, however, that Mr. Leib is given credit on Kennedy's books, not on the department's books. On the latter Mr. Leib would have been debited. There are no entries showing receipt of money loaned, else one might suspect Mr. Kennedy of filling the role of a Shylock. The entry clearly shows that he received $120 from the navy agent, which amount was credited to Leib. Therein lies the mystery. There are intimations occasionally, in the memoranda, that Leib may have been a surgeon in the navy. In that event the doctor may have been the Shylock -- a situation worthy a Sherlock.

What tremendous happenings in the history of a nation may be encompassed in several generations of but one family! Here is young Samuel, about 25 years of age, fighting for the preservation of that Union which his grandfather and great-grandfather helped found, while his maternal great-grandmother narrowly escaped death at the hands of the original Americans at a time when two great European nations fought each other to gain control of the new world. And beside all this it would seem that this family story, commencing, as it does, at the most critical time in the history of the United States -- 1754-1789 -- is to end with the beginning of such another critical period. Robert Kennedy was born near the opening of the former period, and his grandson (the present



Source

This page is from John Seitz Beck's book about the Kennedy family. It was written after his retirement in the 1930s. The original manuscript is typed on a 1930s typewriter with 5 carbons!!! It has been transcribed and added to this site by Peggy Tarrant Robinson. The page numbers, done in red correspond with the original page numbers on the 1930s typed copy.


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